Diabetes And Eye Complications: What You Need To Know

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1. Control your blood sugar.

You already knew that one was coming, right? But studies show that keeping your blood glucose low (but not too low) can help prevent and delay most diabetes complications. Those who keep tight control of their glucose levels experience reduced retinopathy rates. Keep in mind that high blood sugar can also make your vision temporarily blurry, so no need to jump to dire conclusions if you notice things look a little fuzzy one day.

Of course, the whole thing with diabetes is that it’s hard to control your blood sugar, and your levels may rise despite your best efforts. Let the fact that you’re keeping your peepers healthy motivate you to keep up the good work you’re already doing and improve where needed. If you need motivation, check out these tips to improve your A1C!

2. Control your blood pressure.

If you have high blood pressure, reducing it is probably already on your to-do list. High blood pressure puts you at a higher risk for heart disease and can make eye problems worse. Time to put lowering your numbers at the top of your list! For more information on diabetes and high blood pressure, click here.

3. Quit Smoking.

Some folks really enjoy a cigarette now and then, but it’s in the best interest of your eyes to put down the pack. Smoking also increases insulin resistance. Need more motivation? George, who has type 1 diabetes, struggled to quit until his doctor helped him find a very specific motivation. Watch his story here.

4. Don’t be a stranger to your eye doctor.

You should go to see an optometrist or ophthamologist at least once a year—even if you haven’t noticed any vision changes. If you do notice changes in your vision, you should make an appointment sooner rather than later. Remember, treatments work best if issues are detected early.

Our eyes interpret the world for us, and they are worth taking care of. Treat your eyes well, and hopefully, they’ll do the same for you! Stay healthy, friends!

“NEXT” for more ways to keep your eyes healthy!

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Study Says Eating Within a 10-Hour Window Each Day Could Lower Risk of Diabetes and Heart Disease: Click “Next” below!

Katie Taylor started writing in 5th grade and hasn't stopped since. Her favorite place to pen a phrase is in front of her fireplace with a cup of tea, but she's been known to write in parking lots on the backs of old receipts if necessary. She and her husband live cozily in the Pacific Northwest enjoying rainy days and Netflix.
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