You Won’t Believe the Link Between Diabetes and Sleep!

Have an elevated risk of developing diabetes or you’re already living with the disease? READ THIS: quality and quantity of sleep is directly related to your experience. According to University of Chicago researcher Kristen Knutson, PhD, who has studied sleep and diabetes, “Sleep is an important factor for your health, as much as diet and exercise… In the past decade, there has been growing evidence that too little sleep can affect hormones and metabolism in ways that promote diabetes… If you already have type 2 diabetes, poor sleep may make it tougher for you to maintain good blood sugar control.”

In other words, now is the time to get your sleep routine working for you rather than against you. No more excuses — your life is on the line. And we’re here to help.


shutterstock_106258205

Get on a schedule, now!

Okay, so we’ve all sacrificed a reasonable sleep schedule for work, fun, not-so-much-fun, kids, TV — and, suffice to say, lots of other stuff. This is bad — even on the weekends. It’s easier to fall asleep when you stick to a routine time for going to bed and waking up. And what follows falling asleep? Staying asleep, which is what we’re aiming for at approximately seven to eight hours a night. So set both a going to bed time and one for waking up.

Support Research

Fund Diabetes research and care at The Diabetes Site for free!

Whizzco