Diabetic Mom Trained Son to Get Help in an Emergency, Never Dreamed He’d Save Her from a Dog Attack

When Jennifer Musulin, who has type 1 diabetes, trained her young son to get her help in case of a diabetic emergency, she never expected that it would pay off in an entirely different emergency situation. But thank goodness it did.

Jennifer, a teacher at St. Mary Catholic Central High School in Monroe, Michigan, is an experienced rescue volunteer who cares for several foster dogs. Usually, she has no problem handling her dogs, but one of them was acting frightened on this particular day, and Jennifer could sense that it might try to get out and attack her. Sadly, the dog was able to escape from its enclosure, and it proved Jennifer’s gut instinct right.

“I’ve had well over 300 foster dogs with zero bites until this incident,” she says. “But I could tell she felt scared, and at that moment, I just knew she was going to break out.”

Photo: Adobe Stock/Ivan

After the attack, Jennifer immediately called for her 7-year-old son.

When Wyatt heard his mother yelling for help, he expected that she must be having a hypoglycemic attack and may be in need of medical help.

“He was out the door so quick,” Jennifer recalls. “We’ve talked about what to do if I have a low blood sugar emergency, so he knew right away to get help when I yelled for him.”

When he got there, Wyatt realized that his mom had been attacked by one of her foster dogs and was seriously injured. But he didn’t let his fear stop him from springing into action. He ran to a neighbor’s house and knocked and rang the doorbell until someone answered. Then he relayed all the necessary information for a proper 911 call, which the neighbor promptly made.

Photo: Adobe Stock/esoxx

“I told the neighbor to call 911,” Wyatt recalls. “I told her everything she needed to know. I knocked on the door and rang the doorbell so she would hear me.”

With Wyatt’s help, the Monroe Community Ambulance service and the Monroe Township Fire Department were able to arrive within minutes.

“The paramedics who showed up made such a huge difference for me,” Jennifer says. “They calmed me down and kept me from being in a total panic.”

Photo: Adobe Stock/Tyler Olson

In recognition of Wyatt’s bravery and emergency preparedness, the MCA paramedics later presented him with a “Life Saving Award.” The first responders were impressed by his fantastic response in the face of such a frightening situation.

Wyatt, of course, now loves to tell the story to his peers, and we can’t blame him. Plus, it doesn’t hurt to encourage other children to prepare for emergency situations as well!

“Getting this award made Wyatt so proud of himself and happy,” Jennifer said. “I think hearing from the professionals that he did the right thing made a huge impact on him.”

It just goes to show that being prepared is never a bad thing. Thank you, Wyatt, for your bravery and heroic actions!

Elizabeth Nelson

Elizabeth Nelson is a wordsmith, an alumna of Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, a four-leaf-clover finder, and a grammar connoisseur. She has lived in west Michigan since age four but loves to travel to new (and old) places. In her free time, she. . . wait, what’s free time?

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